About

Catlin Tucker High Res Photo

Catlin Tucker is  a Google Certified Teacher and CUE Lead Learner. She teaches 9th and 10th grade English language arts at Windsor High School in Sonoma County, where she was named Teacher of the Year in 2010. She has also taught online college level writing courses, which led to her interest in blended learning.

Corwin published her first book Blended Learning for Grades 4-12 in June 2012 and she authored a blended learning course for ASCD. She co-authored a book titled Creating Your Google Apps Classroom, which was published in June 2014. She is currently working on her second solo book Using Technology to Teach the Common Core Literacy Standards. Catlin has published articles in Educational Leadership, OnCue, and the Teacher Librarian Journal.

She is an experienced professional development facilitator and trainer, education consultant, curriculum designer and frequent Edtech speaker.

Catlin earned her BA in English from UCLA and her English credential and Masters in Education from UCSB. She writes an internationally ranked education technology blog at CatlinTucker.com and is active on Twitter @Catlin_Tucker.

Find me on Twitter at @Catlin_Tucker.

Note: If you are interested in booking a keynote presentation or professional development training, please post a comment to my About page.

60 Responses to About

  1. Diana says:

    Hi Catlin,
    I JUST started reading your posts and information on Collaborize Classroom – and I love them! I teach middle school English and feel that this application has so much potential. I know that you have multiple classes as well, so may I ask how you set up the site? Do you set up a different “category” for each class, or do you group all of them together? I am still working my way through the logistics of the site and any help/advice you can give is much appreciated. Thanks – and thanks!

    • Catlin says:

      Hello Diana,

      I apologize for this ridiculously late reply. My blog has so much spam that I am only now making my way back to the summer postings! My apologies.

      I am thrilled you have enjoyed my postings on Collaborize Classroom. I teach high school English (though I am on sabbatical this year because I just finished my first book on Blended Learning for K-12 teachers- to be published in June).

      I used my single Collaborize site with 6 classes (164 students total). I did create a category for each class and named them 2A English, 3A English, etc. Then I had category groups (i.e. discussion questions, test preparation, creative writing, etc.) under each category for the different types we did online (…I know the wording category vs. category group is confusing).

      Now with the “Groups” feature you can create a group for each class so they only see the questions you post for them as a class.

      You may be well on your way by now, but I wanted to respond since I had not seen this comment before. Please let me know if you have any questions at this point in the year I can answer!

      Catlin

  2. Erik Partida says:

    Glad to see your having success Catlin.

  3. Sarah Fudin says:

    Hi Catlin!

    We’ve connected in the past on #edchat and I wanted to reach out and let you know about a new site we just launched: Teach.com. Because of your importance and influence in education and teaching I wanted to let you know about the new site!

    If you’re interested in getting involved with the site or guest posting on our blog, we’d love to have you — We’d also love some help building our PLN on Twitter (@Teachdotcom) so any help you can give would be very appreciated!

    See you on #edchat!
    Sarah

  4. Rebekah Lund says:

    Do you ever use Collaborize as a venue for students to present work (like creative writing, etc.) that is not a direct response to a discussion question, so then other students can see it and respond to it? I am thinking about having my students start submitting work on Collaborize… What do you think?

    • Catlin says:

      Hello Rebekah,

      Yes, I use my site for creative and formal writing all the time. I like to use media (bizarre pictures or interesting videos) to inspire creative writing on a variety of topics. I create a Vote or Suggest question type and embed the media, then ask students to post their story or poem. After everyone has submitted their creative piece, I ask them to vote for their favorite story. It has been so fun and validating for them. I can tell they put much more effort into their work because they know their peers will be reading them, replying to each other and voting for their favorites.

      When we work on a process paper for a formal essay topic, I ask them to post parts of their essay for peer review. One night I will ask them to post their introduction with hook and thesis for peer feedback. Then I have them select their strongest example of a quote with analysis to share since so many of them struggle with analyzing. I will also post feedback if the class does not catch and error, but it makes my job so much easier since they do a great job of providing each other with constructive criticism and suggestions for improvement (especially after we practiced a few times).

      Let me know if you have any additional questions! Good luck.

      Catlin

  5. Mary Hoffman says:

    I am trying to set up my site to use and am having problems. When I go into the topic library it asks me to create a library profile. I fill out the information requested and click “save my profile”, but it continually tells me {object Object} and won’t save it. Any help?

  6. Catlin says:

    Hello Mick and Vicky,

    I apologize for not responding to your message from this summer sooner! My blog gets so much spam that I am just now wading through these messages.

    I have a ton of resources for teachers using technology that I can share. In fact, I just finished my first book Blended Learning for Grades 4-12: Leveraging Technology to Create a Student Centered Classroom which will be published in June 2012.

    A collection of my resources are hosted at Collaborize Classroom and you can access them at http://www.collaborizeclassroom.com/resources. You can view them and/or download them for free. They are great for any teacher incorporating online work (discussions, group work, etc.) into the traditional classroom setting = blended learning.

    Let me know if you have a need for a resource you don’t see because I may have it in my private collection!

    Nice to connect with you.

    Catlin

  7. Sherry Bosch says:

    Dear Catlin,

    I just listened into your Common Core presentation with Simple K12 and I think you would be a great presenter for ISTE, as well. Would you be willing to talk further about presenting a possible webinar for ISTE?

    Let me know. Thanks, Sherry Bosch, ISTE

  8. M. Westholm says:

    Hello Caitlin,

    Dear Caitlin,

    It’s been a while, but I just wanted to let you know that you were by far the most thoughtful presenter I encountered at the FETC 2012 conference. I really enjoyed your presentation, and have only just started looking at your blog, where I was happy to find the same sorts of insightful evaluation of trends in educational technology.

    Keep up the good work!

    Michelle

    • Catlin says:

      Thank you, Michelle!

      I really enjoyed FETC. I’m looking forward to (hopefully) returning next year. I actually just submitted my sessions for FETC 2013 last week.

      Glad to hear you are enjoying my blog. Take care!

      Catlin

  9. Stephanie Keaney says:

    Caitlin,

    I am putting a handbook together for my NPO’s online teachers. I found an article you wrote, and would like to use it within that handbook, citing you, of course. Can you contact me directly so that I can give you the specifics?

  10. Stephanie says:

    Catlin,

    My colleague and I saw you at the GAFE California Summit a few weeks ago, and we are interested in implementing some of your ideas in our classrooms this year. You mentioned that you have each of your students create a gmail account and that you have a letter you send home about that. I wondered if it would be possible to get a copy of your letter or some suggestions for what to include in a letter of our own, if you wouldn’t mind.

    We really enjoyed your presentation and are very excited to get started using more technology in our classrooms this year!

    Thank you,
    Stephanie

  11. Leslie Monagle says:

    Hi Catlin,
    I just accessed your site through the link on Mind Shift, specifically to the part on Project-Based learning. I teach high school English at a small charter school in Milwaukee, WI, and have been interested in implementing PBLs, but am sometimes stumped with how to come up with real-world problems to tackle in the English classroom. To this end, I am curious about any resources or suggestions you might have.
    Thanks!
    Leslie

    • Catlin says:

      Hi Leslie,

      I found an list of ideas for “driving questions” on Tommy Vincent’s blog:
      Example Driving Questions:

      How can we best stop the flu at our school?
      Is it worth the expense to move to an organic diet?
      Which element of the periodic table is most important?
      Should the U.S. use the metric system?
      Which simple machine is most important to you?
      Should government bail out businesses?
      Is it better to buy or lease a car?
      What if Rosa Parks never gave up her seat?
      Design a better lunch menu for your school.
      What if students use their own mobile devices in school?

      I really enjoyed reading Thom Markham’s blog about “How Project-Based Learning Educates the Whole Child.”

      I hope you find some ideas that are helpful!

      Catlin

  12. Mary Beth Applegate says:

    I was just going over the Collaborize Classroom lessons for this year and I find that one of your postings does not work anymore. It is called “Change for a Dollar.” when I go into it now and click on the video, it goes to a black screen and says “Private.” Is there a way around this or do you want to remove it from the shared lessons?
    Thanks for all the other lessons that you have shared.

    • Catlin says:

      Hi Mary Beth,

      I just did a YouTube search and also couldn’t find it. It must have been removed.

      My apologies.

      Catlin

  13. Catlin,

    I wanted to drop a thank you on you for two things. I think we first cross paths at the Edu Summit at YouTube and I sensed your excellence. But onto my thank yous. One, for being a major force behind tech integration, the right way…. where traditional literacy is being used to facilitate in the design of high tech web 2.0 digital compositions. I have been waging that war at the University of Buffalo, adjuncting new literacies in the Graduate School of Ed for a while…and in the classroom in the Buffalo Public Schools. it is indeed a noble fight to wage. Especially today.

    Secondly, holy crapola! Thank you for my inclusion in your new, super dynamic, most awesome, “Teacher’s Guide to Using Video”. Yeah for me. And everyone else who made it into the golden book. Seriously thanks. I have already shown my Graduate students and rest assured they will be part of the next generation of curators and creators as they prepare their kids to inquire about the world around them.

    Keep up the good fight. As much as I love video, I know from the song, the revolution will not televised, it will be waged.

    Much Peace,

    Keith
    HipHughes History

    • Catlin says:

      Hi Keith,

      It was a privilege to meet the creative minds behind the videos as the Edu Summit. I realized how unfamiliar I was with the educational content available on YouTube. Like most teachers, I didn’t feel like I had the time to search out quality video content. I’m hoping the guide will point other teachers interested in video content, but short on time, to some great channels.

      Thank you for the hard work you do to maintain a quality station. It was a great addition to the guide.

      Take care!

      Catlin

  14. Mark Rathjen says:

    Hi Catlin,
    I’ve seen some of your debate topics on Collaborize, and I’m curious whether you assign them regularly and all students respond, or whether you posted a set and let students select which one they find most interesting?

    Took your “class” at CUE in October and enjoyed it thoroughly, by the way!

    Thanks,
    Mark Rathjen
    Danville, CA

    • Catlin says:

      Hi Mark,

      I use the topics periodically. I design them in chunks (when I have time) and share them with the topic library hoping they might be useful to others. I usually post 2 or 3 at a time and allow students to select the one that interests them most. I want them to have enough other students in the discussion to yield interesting conversations, but I also want them to have some freedom of choice.

      I’m glad to hear you enjoyed the CUE workshop. I had a nasty head cold that weekend, so I did not get to spend as much time at Fall CUE as I would have enjoyed. I’m looking forward to this year!

      Take care. Thank you for the comment.

      Catlin

  15. Rob Hoffman says:

    Hi Catlin,

    We met at CUE this past year and I enjoyed hear about the various tools you are using in your classroom, one being Collaborize Classroom. I would like to start using it for a final project for my students to create discussions for their peers, but I have some questions. When I login to Collaborize Classrooms I see your post from your workshop I participated in with your description about how it was used in your workshop. Is that login my own account or was it through your Collaborize account since you had to approve us? Can I use the same login with my students? If so, how do I make the homepage my own?

    Thank you for your time.

    Rob Hoffman

    • Hello Rob,

      You will need to create your own Collaborize Classroom site to use with students. The site you have access to is one I set up, so I am the moderator. Go to http://www.CollaborizeClassroom.com to sign up.

      Once you have created a site, you can give students your URL and ask them to “register.” Then you will need to approve them so they have access to the site.

      After you have your students on the site, you can show them how to “Start a Discussion.” As the moderator, you will need to “Approve” questions before they are visible to other members of your CC community.

      Catlin

  16. Liz Dodds says:

    Hello Catlin – I recently bought a copy of your book about blended learning. You have a lot of good ideas in there. I wondered if you might consider presenting a workshop or concurrent session about blended learning at the next CSLA conference? Or perhaps you could recommend someone?

    The California School Library Association annual conference will be held February 6-9, 2014, in San Diego.

    School librarians and library staff are interested in a wide variety of topics, including blended learning.

    Here is the link to our call for proposals: http://csla.net/2014-conference-call-for-proposals/

    Although we cannot pay you for your workshop or session, we would like to make the offer of you being able to attend all of the other sessions on your presentation day for free.

    Thank you so much for your consideration and please feel free to contact me if you have any questions.

    Warm Regards, Liz Dodds, CoChair of Concurrent Sessions, CSLA 2014 Conference

    • Hi Liz,

      Thank you for the invitation! I wish I could attend, but I already have several speaking engagements lined up in February that will take me out of the classroom. It is a popular month for events and conferences! I am happy to tweet out the link for your call for proposals if that would be helpful. I know lots of dynamic educators who might enjoy being part of your conference. Let me know if it is okay for me to spread the word via Twitter.

      I’m thrilled to hear that you’ve found my book useful. Librarians play such an important role in leading a school in technology integration.

      Enjoy your summer!

      Catlin

  17. Amber Morley says:

    Hi Catlin,

    I took a few of your webinars today on simplek12 and I was really interested in your use of Google applications within the classroom. I went to Google to check it out and I noticed that there is a lot of resources there. Can you suggest a good starting point? I am a new teacher and I am very interested in flipping my classroom and/or using the applications you discussed from Google.

    Thanks so much!

    Amber

  18. Jasmine Chan says:

    Hi Ms. Tucker, I am Jasmine Chan from the University of the Philippines Diliman. I attended one of your webinars last month. As partial requirement for our “Computers in Teaching” course, my classmates and I are trying to arrange a webinar and we are hoping to have you as our speaker. It will only be 30 minutes long and can be scheduled anytime between September 1 to October 1, covering any topic you wish to discuss. It will be attended by at least 20 students from our class, but obtaining you as our speaker will definitely increase our audience. Will you be interested?

    • Hello Jasmine,

      What time period would work for your course? I can look at my calendar to find a few dates that work.

      I present on a variety of topics. Is there anything of particular interest that your group would like to learn more about?

      Catlin

      • Jasmine Chan says:

        Any available time from September 1 to October 1 would be great.

        Topic would be your choice of:
        1. 20 Sites for fast-paced students
        2. 20+ sites for elementary teachers
        3. 7 habits for the tech-savvy teachers
        or any topic about edtech that you would be most comfortable to discuss.

        Thank you!

  19. Cori says:

    Mrs. Tucker,

    My name is Cori, and I’m an 11th grade honors English teacher in Pennsylvania. I have recently begun taking a Teaching New Media and Literacies class at Pittsburgh University, while at the same time I just began teaching students who all have their own personal laptops to use in school. The idea of using new media to engage students seems like a natural solution to the lack of engagement I’ve started to notice with pencil and paper assignments. I have started putting together ideas about how to use the many online resources available to teachers (I’m having students do collaborative prewriting with Google Docs this week), but I have a basic philosophy question I hope you wouldn’t mind answering… How much of what you do in the classroom (and for homework) is computer-based, and how much do you use paper and pencil assignments? I’m tempted to move more toward a computer-based classroom because of the resources we have at our school, and because of the fundamental change that is occurring in our students’ lives after they graduate– I know that in my own graduate classes, almost all of the reading I do is online, and classroom discussion takes place there as well. However, I have some kind of inexplicable fear of abandoning traditional pencil and paper assignments altogether. Am I setting myself up for disaster by trying to move toward a web-based classroom environment? Do you have any advice for a teacher just starting to move towards this?

    Thank you!

    Cori

    • Hello Cori,

      Homework in my class is almost exclusively online. Students engage in online discussions with Collaborize Classroom, they collaborate on shared Google docs, read and research with Diigo. The only work that is not completed online is their reading and annotations. Because we do not have a 1:1 program, students are reading their texts the old fashion way. They also annotate their reading by hand. Occasionally, they will write notes which I present online (vocabulary and writing videos primarily).

      I can understand and relate to your fear. Going paperless was a big shift for me. I didn’t learn that way as a student, and I was not taught to teach that way. As you stated in your post, life beyond the classroom is increasingly technology rich and web based. Students need to learn how to engage with each other online and develop technology fluency to be “college and career ready.”

      My advice is don’t think of it as all or nothing. I started slow. I replaced some of my pen and paper assignments with dynamic online discussions. Then I started shifting all of their writing to Google docs. From there I added tools like Diigo to my tool belt. If you shift one tool at a time, it is less daunting and scary. I wrote an article for ASCD titled “The Basics of Blended Learning” which might be worth reading as it discusses my advice for teachers new this blending of learning mediums.

      Good luck! I think you’ll be pleasantly surprised by the outcome.

      Catlin

  20. Jasmine Chan says:

    Hi Ms. Tucker, I am Jasmine Chan again. I would just like to ask if we can get your confirmation about the date and the topic? thank you! God bless.

  21. Lisa Halim says:

    Hi Catlin,

    I’ve really enjoyed your blog, it’s been the most helpful blog on blended learning and technology that I’ve that I’ve been able to find, so thank you! I’m beginning to use technology to ‘flip’ my 8th Grade Language Arts and History classes. I’ve actually been ‘flipping’ for years; students would read and interact with their textbook before coming to class in order to be prepared for a class discussion and/or project. However, I’ve run into a lot of push-back from parents and students. The issue is lack of technology at home. I have several students without computers and/or internet. The equity issue regarding ‘flipping’ has popped up and I’m not sure how to handle it. Also, I have several parents who do not want their children online because they fear security issues. Have you ever had to deal with these issues? How would you suggest I handle them? Thank you!

    • Hello Lisa,

      I’m so glad you’ve found my blog helpful. I teach on a block schedule, so students have 2 days to complete their flipped assignments. Most of my students have access at home, but the ones who don’t are able to use computers in the library to complete their assignments. I also have many students who watch the videos on their mobile devices.

      Do you have any technology in your classroom? If so, I think it’s still valuable to consider flipping in the classroom. Students can work in groups rotating through consuming the information and applying it. This allows them to consume the content at their own pace and also provides a community support as they work to apply what they have learned.

      I also have a student use computer in my room that was donated by our local computer recycling center. I always encourage students without access to come use that computer at lunch, break or after school. That might be a strategy for creating equity.

      Good luck!

      Catlin

  22. Keisha Feser says:

    Ms. Tucker,
    I saw your youtube video on writing an argument. I would like to share it with my colleagues. Unfortunately, youtube is blocked by out fire wall. Is it possible to get a copy of the video sent to me directly, so I can download it to share. It would be a great help to me as I help my team move forward. Thank you.

  23. Travis Phelps says:

    Mrs. Tucker,

    I attended your recent keynote for the Diocese of San Jose. I thought you did a great job with the speech, and it is a great inspiration for teachers. You clearly do great things in the classroom on a regular basis.

    I do have one question. There was a program or app you showed during your presentation, and it looked like an online discussion forum. There were many lines of text that appeared to be stacked up and down. Is there any way you could tell me what app / website it was? I believe that it was not the sticky note website you mentioned. I’m sorry that I can’t be more specific!

    Thank you so much for coming down to San Jose and doing a great presentation.

    Travis

  24. Hi, Catlin!

    I caught your name at a technology inservice and looked up your website, and…WOW!! I love what you do! You have so many great ideas, and I truly appreciate your sharing them with the world. Specifically, I began my own website based on your recommendation of Weebly, and my students created their online portfolios through the site.

    Their samples are on my website: http://www.drpatrickwhite.com/

    Communication with my students and their parents has been streamlined and much more effective because of Weebly. So, I just want to say a huge THANK YOU for all you do! You’re making a positive ripple effect that is going on…and on…

    Thanks again!

    Patrick White
    Brentwood High School
    Nashville, TN

    • Thank you for the kind words and for sharing your work, Patrick!

      I’m thrilled to hear your enjoying online portfolios! I loved the process of supporting students as they built their own websites and posted their work.

      Good luck.

      Catlin

  25. Donna Reed says:

    I think what you are doing is great! I am currently working on the last stages of a Master’s thesis on the design of curriculum for teachers to integrate mobile technologies into their classroom. One area of focus is on how mobile technologies can foster a more student-centered classroom! I just ordered your book online and look forward to reading it!

    • Thank you, Donna!

      I hope you find my book useful in your work.

      Good luck on your Master’s thesis. I’m a huge fan of mobile technology and BYOD approaches to technology integration. My low-tech classroom has been completely transformed by the mobile tech my students walk in the door with.

      Take care.

      Catlin

  26. George Gladish says:

    Catlin, several members of the Lower Kuskokwim School District attended your Transitioning to the New Standards with Google Apps training in Anchorage, AK and were impressed with it. If possible, we would like to see if you can provide that training to our staff during our district-wide inservice. Would you please contact me so we can discuss this possibility? Thank you.

  27. FATEMA EBRAHIM says:

    Dear Catlin,

    My name is Fatema Ebrahim, I recently graduated from NYU with a Master’s in Public Relations & Corporate Communication. I’m part of a startup called “Kipin Hall”. Its a retention solution that uses analytics and behavioral interventions to help students towards college completion. It’s like fitocracy for students. Our website is http://www.kipinhall.com.

    I’m reaching out to influential people like yourself who share the same passion about education. I’m working on a research project – “The use of K-12 educational technologies for increasing student and parent engagement”.

    Goal: I want to get input from teachers on challenges they face in helping students and their families, especially the students who are in most need

    I would love to talk to you and set up a brief meeting with you at your convenience. We are always open to learn new insight and share our thoughts with like minded professionals in the field. Would love to connect with you!

    Please let me know if you are interested in connecting. Looking forward to hearing from you.

    Regards
    Fatema

  28. Caitlin,

    I am about to publish a Google Apps textbook called Google Drive Essentials (http://googledriveforkids.com). I am wondering if it would be worth the effort to publish a Kindle version of the book in addition to the print version. I posed this question on Twitter and Alice Keeler suggested I ask you about your thoughts. The book includes 35 Google Apps tutorials and assessments so the student/user would have the book next to them at a computer. I am not sure how easy a book with lots of formatting and graphics would translate to this medium. Any advice you can provide would be greatly appreciated.

    Regards,
    George Somers
    @googledrivekids

    • Hi George,

      When I published my first book, the Kindle version took several months to come out after the printed version. I was surprised by the number of people who requested an electronic version. I guess I should not have been surprised given that it was a book on blended learning. Many of the teachers interested in technology prefer to have digital copies of texts. I’m not sure how challenging the formatting and other issues would be for you, so it’s hard to say if it will ultimately be worth it.

      Good luck with your book!

      Catlin

  29. Chelsea Cohen says:

    Hey Catlin!

    I have developed a rubric for my students’ papers… They all just submitted them to me via Google Docs. I am wondering how you grade your students’ papers with a rubric. Do you add your comments to their paper and then attached the rubric below? Or, do you fill out the rubric and send it as a form? Any advice would be greatly appreciated! Was very inspired by your talk at SVHS last month :)

    Chelsea

    • Hi Chelsea,

      I actually use a script on the OLD spreadsheets (version before the “add-ons” were added) called FormEmailer to blast out student feedback and grades directly from spreadsheets. I created my rubrics using Forms and then sent emails directly to each student from the spreadsheet. Here is a blog I wrote about that: http://catlintucker.com/2013/02/formemailer-send-emails-directly-from-spreadsheets

      Now that Google Spreadsheets has updated (I did not update my spreadsheets on my school account), they have add-ons. One add-on called Another Mail Merge can also send emails directly from a spreadsheet. You can learn more at this link: https://sites.google.com/site/scriptsexamples/available-web-apps/mail-merge

      If these two options aren’t clear, then you can copy and paste a rubric in the form of a table into the bottom of your students’ documents and fill in the comments there. It might be a more straightforward way to do it at first.

      Let me know if you have any additional questions. I’m so glad you enjoyed my presentation at Sonoma Valley!

      Catlin

  30. Hey Catlin,
    I am a former Teach for America and KIPP teacher and have enjoyed following your posts. I wanted to inform you about http://www.listencurrent.com, which curates public radio content for classroom and creates lessons and materials for teachers. Having used it, I have seen its power to engage students and develop their listening skills.

    If interested, I’d love to set you up with a free premium account for you to review and potentially share to your followers if you like. Just let me know!

    All the best,
    Warren

  31. Kristen Berg says:

    Hi Catlin,
    I’m an instructional technology coach in SRVUSD. I’ve heard you speak numerous times at M.E.R.I.T./CUE/Google Summits, and I think you’re amazing. Recently I’ve been tasked with working with a cohort of principals to launch a blended learning initiative in our district. So, of course, I immediately purchased your book. I’m looking for blended learning classrooms where I can bring this group of interested administrators to see it in action. Do you know of districts who have been successful in launching blended learning? Any suggestions you have wold be great. Thanks! Kristen Berg

    • Hi Kristen,

      I don’t know of any districts that are doing a full move to blended learning in California. I’ve worked with Holton-Arms School in Maryland, which has embraced a blended learning model.

      I wish I could be of more help to you on this. Although I have embraced a blended model in my classroom, it is not a school wide shift. A school wide shift looks different than a single teacher moving to a blended approach. That said, you’d be welcome to come check out my classroom if that would be helpful.

      Good luck!

      Catlin

  32. Kristen Berg says:

    Catlin,

    Thanks so much for your reply! I know how busy your are and I appreciate your time. We’re really looking for any classrooms utilizing a blended learning model to check out. I’d love to take you up on your offer and come visit your classroom. Let me know how I would go about setting that up.

    Thanks!
    Kristen Berg

  33. Yvette Wagner says:

    Hello –

    We are interested in having you as a keynote speaker at our Annual Leadership Symposium.

    The dates are March 5th – 7th 2015 in Riverside.

    I would love to speak with you at your earliest convenience.

    Yvette Wagner

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